Ashley Judd Stands up to the Media and Press

As posted by A MIGHTY GIRL on August 20, 2014:

When the media went into a frenzy over actress Ashley Judd’s “puffy” appearance, Judd struck back with this fantastic statement: “The assault on our body image, the hypersexualization of girls and women and subsequent degradation of our sexuality as we walk through the decades, and the general incessant objectification is what this conversation allegedly about my face is really about…. The insanity has to stop, because as focused on me as it appears to have been, it is about all girls and women. In fact, it’s about boys and men, too, who are equally objectified and ridiculed, according to heteronormative definitions of masculinity that deny the full and dynamic range of their personhood. It affects each and every one of us, in multiple and nefarious ways: our self-image, how we show up in our relationships and at work, our sense of our worth, value, and potential as human beings.”

Read her full statement on the Daily Beast at http://thebea.st/1dlPPek

For an excellent film exploring the often disparaging portrayals of women and girls in the mainstream media and how they contribute to the under-representation of women in positions of power and influence, we highly recommend Miss Representation for ages 12 and up at http://www.amightygirl.com/miss-representation

If you’re seeking resources to help encourage a healthy body image in girls, check out “Body Image” section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/personal-development/life-challenges?cat=378

For books for parents that address body image issues, including the helpful guide “101 Ways to Help Your Daughter Love Her Body,” visit our “Body Image / Self-Esteem” parenting section at http://www.amightygirl.com/parenting/body-image-self-esteem

And, for parenting books that explore the early sexualization of girls, visit our “Child Sexualization” parenting section at http://www.amightygirl.com/parenting?cat=447

When the media went into a frenzy over actress Ashley Judd’s “puffy” appearance, Judd struck back with this fantastic statement.

Bonus Points for Lego – Girl Power!!!

Finally a toy company is making strong, intelligent, awesome female characters. They are not all pink and purple Lego blocks, they do not look like a Barbie, they don’t worry about what size pants they wear, they aren’t wearing high heels, they aren’t wearing shirts that say “Math is Stupid” or “School Sucks” and they don’t play beer pong, or work at Hooters; they are just awesome.  I might even have to get these just for myself ( nerd alert … nerd alert). It does say ages 10+ and I am in the “plus” range.

Originally posted on Lego.com website

Explore the world and beyond at the Research Institute!

The Research Institute has everything that you need to explore the world below, around and above us! Created by real-life geoscientist, Ellen Kooijman (alias:Alatariel), and selected by LEGO® Ideas members (formerly known as CUUSOO), this collection of scenes depicts three varied professions within the world of natural science. Help the paleontologist study the origin of dinosaurs with the magnifying glass, map the skies with the astronomer and her telescope, and assist the chemist as she carries out experiments in her lab. This set also includes building instructions, as well as a booklet containing information about the creator and an introduction to each of the professions featured in the set. There’s a whole world of exciting professions out there to explore – build and role play them to see if they suit you! Includes 3 minifigures: paleontologist, astronomer and a chemist.

  • Includes paleontologist, astronomer and chemist minifigures
  • Features paleontology, astronomy, and chemistry scenes on a 6×6 baseplate
  • Paleontology scene features a dinosaur skeleton, microscope and a magnifying glass
  • Astronomy scene features a telescope and a sky chart
  • Chemistry scene features a cabinet, tools, bottles and flasks
  • Discover new stars and planets through the telescope
  • Study the dinosaur skeleton up close
  • Concoct new formulas in the chemist’s lab
  • Gives a great insight into the world of natural science
  • Build the model voted for by LEGO® Ideas members
  • Includes building instructions and booklet with information about the creator and professions featured in the set
  • Each scene measures over 1” (5cm) high, 1” (4cm) wide and 1” (4cm) deep

If you want even more female characters, A Mighty Girl is offering a huge set of all female characters in a variety of jobs for $49.99. Check it out right HERE.

Lego Community Minifigures Set

Celebrate the life of an Amazing Woman: Pioneering Chemist Stephanie Kwolek

Originally Posted on A Might Girl: http://www.amightygirl.com (You can also find them on Facebook):

Today in Mighty Girl history, pioneering chemist Stephanie Kwolek, whose invention of Kevlar has saved countless lives, was born in 1923. Kevlar is a fiber five times stronger than steel that is now used in numerous products ranging from boots for firefighters to spacecraft — and most famously, in bulletproof vests. It’s estimated that since Kevlar’s introduction to body armor in the 1970s, the lives of 3,000 police officers have been saved, as well as those of innumerable soldiers and others in conflict zones. On the day that she died last month at the age of 90, DuPont announced that the one-millionth protective vest made using Kwolek’s lifesaving invention was sold.

Born to Polish immigrants, Kwolek grew up near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and earned a degree in chemistry from Margaret Morrison Carnegie College, now a part of Carnegie Mellon University. Kwolek initially planned to become a doctor but could not afford medical school. She accepted a position as a chemist with DuPont in 1946 on what she thought would be a temporary basis until she could pursue her interest in medicine. After becoming engrossed in research, she decided that chemistry was her passion and eventually stayed at DuPont for over 40 years.Today in Mighty Girl history, pioneering chemist Stephanie Kwolek, whose invention of Kevlar has saved countless lives, was born in 1923. Kevlar is a fiber five times stronger than steel that is now used in numerous products ranging from boots for firefighters to spacecraft -- and most famously, in bulletproof vests. It's estimated that since Kevlar's introduction to body armor in the 1970s, the lives of 3,000 police officers have been saved, as well as those of innumerable soldiers and others in conflict zones. On the day that she died last month at the age of 90, DuPont announced that the one-millionth protective vest made using Kwolek's lifesaving invention was sold. Born to Polish immigrants, Kwolek grew up near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and earned a degree in chemistry from Margaret Morrison Carnegie College, now a part of Carnegie Mellon University. Kwolek initially planned to become a doctor but could not afford medical school. She accepted a position as a chemist with DuPont in 1946 on what she thought would be a temporary basis until she could pursue her interest in medicine. After becoming engrossed in research, she decided that chemistry was her passion and eventually stayed at DuPont for over 40 years. Kwolek discovered Kevlar while working as part of a team trying to find alternatives to replace the steel used in radial tires in order to make cars lighter in anticipation of a future gas shortage. In 1964, she was trying to convert a solid polymer into a liquid form and her creation turned out thin and opaque rather than the syrupy mixture she expected. Although her peers thought it was a failed experiment, she persisted with her investigation and discovered that, after the liquid was removed, the fiber was unusually stiff. Further research revealed the vast potential of Kwolek's discovery and DuPont eventually invested $500 million to develop it for commercial application. The recipient or co-recipient of 17 patents, Kwolek has been widely honored for her contributions to science, including the1999 Lemelson-MIT Lifetime Achievement Award, 1996 National Medal of Technology, the American Innovator Award, as well as being inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame. DuPont also awarded her the company's Lavoisier Medal for outstanding technical achievement and she remains the only female employee to ever receive that honor. To Kwolek, however, who headed polymer research at DuPont until her retirement in 1989, the impact of her work was her greatest reward. In an interview with the Chemical Heritage Foundation, she observed: "When I look back on my career I'm inspired most by the fact that I was fortunate enough to do something that would be of benefit to mankind. It's been an extremely satisfying discovery. I don't think there's anything like saving someone's life to bring you satisfaction and happiness." To watch an excellent 15 minute video biography on Stephanie Kwolek and her incredible scientific contributions, visit http://bit.ly/1lkHy15 Stephanie Kwolek is one of the many female inventors featured in the excellent book "Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women" for ages 8 and up at http://www.amightygirl.com/girls-think-of-everything She is also the subject of a children's book for ages 7 to 9, "The Woman Who Invented the Thread that Stops Bullets: The Genius of Stephanie Kwolek" at http://www.amightygirl.com/stephanie-kwolek For a fantastic fictional story starring a girl who loves to invent, we highly recommend "Rosie Revere, Engineer" for ages 4 to 9 at http://www.amightygirl.com/rosie-revere-engineer To encourage your Mighty Girl's interest in science, visit our "Science Toys" section at http://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math And, for one of our favorite toys to get kids excited about chemistry from a young age, check out this colorful set of Periodic Table Building Blocks at http://www.amightygirl.com/periodic-table-building-blocks

Kwolek discovered Kevlar while working as part of a team trying to find alternatives to replace the steel used in radial tires in order to make cars lighter in anticipation of a future gas shortage. In 1964, she was trying to convert a solid polymer into a liquid form and her creation turned out thin and opaque rather than the syrupy mixture she expected. Although her peers thought it was a failed experiment, she persisted with her investigation and discovered that, after the liquid was removed, the fiber was unusually stiff. Further research revealed the vast potential of Kwolek’s discovery and DuPont eventually invested $500 million to develop it for commercial application.

The recipient or co-recipient of 17 patents, Kwolek has been widely honored for her contributions to science, including the 1999 Lemelson-MIT Lifetime Achievement Award, 1996 National Medal of Technology, the American Innovator Award, as well as being inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame. DuPont also awarded her the company’s Lavoisier Medal for outstanding technical achievement and she remains the only female employee to ever receive that honor.

To Kwolek, however, who headed polymer research at DuPont until her retirement in 1989, the impact of her work was her greatest reward. In an interview with the Chemical Heritage Foundation, she observed: “When I look back on my career I’m inspired most by the fact that I was fortunate enough to do something that would be of benefit to mankind. It’s been an extremely satisfying discovery. I don’t think there’s anything like saving someone’s life to bring you satisfaction and happiness.”

To watch an excellent 15 minute video biography on Stephanie Kwolek and her incredible scientific contributions, visit http://bit.ly/1lkHy15

Stephanie Kwolek is one of the many female inventors featured in the excellent book “Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women” for ages 8 and up at http://www.amightygirl.com/girls-think-of-everything

She is also the subject of a children’s book for ages 7 to 9, “The Woman Who Invented the Thread that Stops Bullets: The Genius of Stephanie Kwolek” at http://www.amightygirl.com/stephanie-kwolek

For a fantastic fictional story starring a girl who loves to invent, we highly recommend “Rosie Revere, Engineer” for ages 4 to 9 at http://www.amightygirl.com/rosie-revere-engineer

To encourage your Mighty Girl’s interest in science, visit our “Science Toys” section at http://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

And, for one of our favorite toys to get kids excited about chemistry from a young age, check out this colorful set of Periodic Table Building Blocks at http://www.amightygirl.com/periodic-table-building-blocks

The Empowerment Plan

Today on Facebook, I read an article from A Mighty Girl about this amazing young woman, Veronika Scott, who is doing something to help the homeless in her home town.  She created an item that is so unique I am sure that there will be some copycats coming out in the near future.  I am so impressed with her concept and the fact that she hires the homeless, I just had to share this with you today.

140314132805-cnn10-women-veronika-scott-horizontal-gallery

Here is an excerpt from A Mighty Girl:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.”

Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets.

empowerment-plan-jacket-537x362

Self Heating & Waterproof

You can read the full article on Facebook: A Mighty Girl


Blogger David Merritt, posted an article on his Blog (Goodness Determined) about Veronika way back in 2011. I wonder why it’s taken the rest of the world so long to hear about such an incredible person.  One would think that she would have been bigger news way before now. Oh, I forgot, Obamacare, Anjelina Jolie, Meg Ryan, Tom Cruise, missing planes, war, the Pope, The Hunger Games, Fashion Week in Paris, gas prices, milk prices, the national debt of Greece, Government bailouts, Kim Jong-un inherits a country, WikiLeaks, hurricanes, earthquakes, sports, sports and more sports, the rich are getting richer, the Olympics, Gay Marriage, Russia, and the Royal Wedding have all been far more important than something of this nature. Who wants to see good things on the news anyways, right?

vs_7


You can watch a brief video on You Tube about Veronika, and how this project came into fruition here: http://youtu.be/mo-kvh1w60w

I noticed she has a lot of sponsors, Including, GAP. Which makes me wonder what THEY are doing to help the homeless situation. Does GAP employ homeless people and train them so that they can go out into the world and be self sufficient?  Does GAP merely provide a warehouse for her to run her shop in? Or do they merely want their name on a “Good Thing”. I’m sure we will never really know.  However, with young people out there like Veronika, the world isn’t such a bad place after all.  Now all we have to do is get more programs like this going in more cities across the states and get more people involved to help make it happen.

The Truth about Media and Positive Role Models

Word of mouth is infectious. It can take over an entire city, state, and even a whole county. It gets into all those nooks and crannies and stays there lingering, just waiting to pounce at the right moment. One negative comment can spread like wildfire, while the positive ones seem to creep along at a snails pace. It’s all human nature. We are drawn to stare compulsively at a terrible car crash, we are compelled beyond our control to gossip about what other people wear, or eat. We just can’t help it; we all love a good train wreck, cake wreck, videos of pretty models falling down, right?

Part of my goal with my blog is to stay positive and spread  happiness and good energy back into the world.  Everyone can use a positive and kind word, not just sometimes, but all the time. Repclae that negative comment about that poor girl’s outfit, with something like, “You have a beautiful smile” or  “I love the color of you hair”. If you really look deep, you can find something wonderful about every person. It’s our own inner demons and lack of self confidence that make us get defensive and downright mean. How much better do you really feel when you make someone else feel awful?  I GUARANTEE that the more positive you are and the more you compliment people, you will start to change the way you see yourself and you will become happier and more self confident as well.

What’s happening to our younger generations is abominable. Girls as young as 8, 9 and 10 already have body image issues. They already see every flaw on their body.  “My thighs are jiggly”, “My stomach sticks out”, or “My face is too chubby” are things I have personally heard 4th and 5th graders say. Why are we obsessed with what the media tells us is perfect? No one is perfect. I repeat: NO ONE IS PERFECT. I have learned a lot over the years, especially doing live theatre. I have seen time after time, a thin, beautiful, talented woman get cast in the part I wanted, only to have them gripe about how imperfect they are. They have cellulite, their stomach isn’t flat, their chest is too small, etc. etc. Why are we so hard on ourselves?

We should be taught to appreciate things about out bodies and ourselves. We should be teaching our children that they are beautiful just the way they are. They are growing and changing, and they shouldn’t worry so much about it. Imagine a world where every child went to “Self Confidence Class” where the homework is too draw a self portrait and list their 3 favorite things about their face. Or the lesson in class would be to partner up and spend the next 15 minutes telling the other person everything that is awesome about them. I know I am living in a fantasy world, but that fantasy could become a reality if we all started banding together and started to change they way we see what “pretty” is.

So let’s start with the bad. Here are some great videos on what’s going on out there in the media. You may have already watched one or more of these, but I urge you to watch again, and if you have children, please talk to them and show them that ads, movies, videos, magazines are just as fake and unreal as cartoons, talking dinosaurs, and green grouchy monsters.

  1.  Killing Us Softly 3
  2.  Killing Us Softly 4
  3. The Photoshop Effect
  4. Standard of Beauty
  5. 5 Minute Retouch
  6. Dove Evolution
  7. Bad News


It is our job as parents to make sure they know what’s real and what’s not. So let us move on to positive things and media that we can show our children.  Certain celebrities and models are taking a stand against extreme photoshopping while many are rejecting any kind of photoshop. Let’s hope the trend keeps growing. One website that is making itself known is A Mighty Girl.

mighty-logo-300x135

Let me start by saying this website completely ROCKS. You can also find them on Facebook, click the “like” button, and you will be treated to many amazing, uplifting, and real honest to good role models and stories for you and your daughter.  They carry books, dress up, toys, games, movies, clothing, music and more.  They give a nice description and share many details about the items and the author, recommended ages, etc. There’s even a link to purchase items on Amazon, but still support them. They have easy filters to narrow down your search by ages, or topic.  Heck, there’s a ton of historical books that I would jut LOVE to sink my teeth into.

I feel that even though this is a girl power kind of website, I think it’s very important to also share aspects of these things with the boys. We need to teach them to respect women from an early age, or our girls will continue to battle throughout their lives and future generations. The key is equality for everyone; no matter who you are, where you come from, how much money you have, or what kind of clothes you wear, color of your hair, or if you wear glasses or freckles. Everyone should be treated with respect. Teach your kids to be whoever they want to be.


Here are some points of interest.

::: BOOKS :::

They have everything from independent-minded princesses, to historical figures, environmental, social issue, personal development, civil rights, heros, and so much more. There is really something for everyone. My list of favorites is in the hundreds, and hard to choose just a few, but once you start looking it will be hard to stop.


:: TOYS :::

Who says boys are the only ones who can build or get dirty or like bugs? And who says girls should always be a damsel in distress, a princess locked in a tower and play house. Here you will find a huge assortment of toys and game for all ages – babies to adults! It’s refreshing to see some of the toys are NOT pink and purple and just any color. Not all girls like pink, my daughter hated pink until she was older.


::: CLOTHING :::

So instead of your daughter wearing a shirt that says something like  “School is Boring” or “Math is too hard” why not try one of these refreshingly awesome t-shirts!

 

kind-shirt math-girls pi-shirt saves-self scientist1 strong